Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Two pedestrian bridges on Naviglio grande - Lombardini Street and Parenzo Street, Milan






Project Info


Client:
EXPO 2015 SpA, MM – metropolitana milanese SpA
Design: Lombardini22
Project leader: Arch. Marco Amosso
Computational designer: Arch. Matteo Noto
Structural engineers: Buro Happold
General contractor: Maltauro SpA, metal structures – Carraro steel srl
Year: 2015
Location: Milano, Naviglio grande & Ripa di porta ticinese
Dimensions: Via Lombardini Bridge – length: 20.6m, bridge surface 95m2, ground surface 245m2;  Via Parenzo Bridge – length:18m, bridge surface 87m2, ground surface 180m2

"The two bridges are modeled as urban design objects and their shape is inspired by nature as a skeleton of an ancient animal. Inspiration comes also from the world of navigation, in fact the structure of the bridges reminds the structure of river boats.

The bridges were designed with Rhino and Grasshopper since the very beginning of the competition phase.

Rhinoceros and Grasshopper were used for many purposes:

First, the two bridges were generated by the same algorithm, which is good for time saving and especially good to check the design at the initial phase, in fact the bridges have the same shape but different measures. The one in Lombardini street  is 20m long, whereas the one in Parenzo street is just 18m. Both are 5m wide at the center.

Then, the main curvature is controlled in Rhino and Grasshopper to have a correct slope for Italian regulation. Plates below the bridge are parametrically controlled in their shape and number.

We controlled the surface of the bridge up to the detailed scheme defining in Rhinoceros the thickness of all the different elements. The Balustrade is also modelled with Grasshopper, even if it has a simple typology its vertical elements  are at different coordinates because they follow the main curvature of the bridge.

In conclusion, Rhinoceros and Grasshopper were very useful  to achieve an astonishing design and at the same time a very good control of the overall geometry".


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