Tuesday, July 1, 2014

GeMo, an army of 3D printed vases

Mehran Gharleghi and Amin Sadeghy from studio INTEGRATE, are seeking support to launch a crowd funded exhibition of an army of 3D printed vases in London

With a keen interest in exploring  the legacy of Middle Eastern art, combined with advanced methods of digital fabrication, they have created an army of over 500 mass customized 3D printed vases, called GeMo. GeMo utilizes the potentials of 3D printing technologies by creating a non-repetitive series of objects that are otherwise very cumbersome to manufacture using conventional methods. The form of each vase is generated from one of the fundamental components of Islamic art. It is made of two symmetrical octagons that merge into each other by using an algorithm. The algorithm uses repetition, rotation and symmetry to merge and develop  the original shapes. This method is often used in creating traditional Islamic drawings and art.  The word algorithm itself originates from, Al-Khwārizmī (c. 780-850), a Persian mathematician, astronomer, geographer and scholar. Digital tools were used to capture these steps to create over 500 unique variations that can only be realized by a 3D printer. By using this method, GeMo retained its cultural roots while leading to a novel set of artifacts.

Each 3D printed GeMo is individually unique, yet resembles its neighbouring relative which is called "Genetically Modified" (GeMo). Around 10% of the geometries that are generated out of this algorithm are mutants and due to their center of gravity cannot stand. So, these will not to be 3D printed. 

GeMo embodies the potential of what 3D-print fabrication is offering to contemporary design culture. Hence, with the aim of raising awareness of the possibilities of 3D printing, Mehran and Amin are turning to Kickstarter to raise funds to launch an exhibition in London, showcasing their army over 500 individually unique 3D printed vases. Their supporters will become the only owners and exhibitors of GeMo, which will be sent to them after the exhibition. By supporting the GeMo campaign, you will help a one-of-a-kind and exclusive design become recognized by a wider audience of art and design enthusiasts from around the world. Each GeMo(s) will be named after its (their) supporter. 

GeMo will be printed in multiple materials, such as stainless steel, plastic, resin and alumide. This is a possibility that has emerged from the world of digital design and production. Now, the army of GeMo is ready and they need them to be born. 

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